After the annual elections, the Key Peninsula Community Services welcomed three new officers to the Board of Directors: Helen Saxen, Gary Stevenson and Gary Running.

“We’ve added some fresh faces and a new vitality,” Running, the new president of the board, said, “and we’re definitely looking forward to a bright tomorrow.”

According to Running, plans for the board “look to the future,” focusing on the younger generation and helping the community even more than before. They have been looking into getting a nurse out on the KP. They also started a new volunteer program for younger people to work and let the seniors relax and enjoy what they’ve helped build.

“Our seniors are our cornerstone,” Running said. “They’ve really created a secure foundation for us to do this, and I want to make sure they get credit for everything they’ve done. If the cornerstone’s secure you can do a lot with the building, add as many levels as you want. And that’s what we’re doing — adding another level.”

Running cites a “character of unity and agreement” as another change, saying the board is basing decisions on “values and principles as well as right and wrong.”

“We had some bad press over a situation a while ago, and I think it’s important people know any and all allegations have been answered. The whole atmosphere’s changed. I’ve had people tell me it’s comfortable here and it feels like home,” he said.

The board is trying to maintain a “light” environment where everyone can feel comfortable and happy. “This place is building and building fast,” Running said. “That’s why we’ve got to change with it.”

KPCS also plans to make changes to the building.

“When I look out here,” Running said, gesturing to the neat blue rows of unoccupied chairs, “I don’t see empty tables. We could have bingo going on over here and the seniors who want to watch the Mariners game could sit in here and we could have more activities in the other room. I mean, we’ve got seniors that don’t use these facilities; we want to find out why and see what we can do to accommodate them,” Running said. “Come here even a year from now and see how different it is.”

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