Registration is now open for Key Pen Parks’ PeeWee basketball classes.

The classes will begin Feb. 15 and will run for six consecutive Saturdays, according to Jessica Smeall, Key Pen Parks recreation coordinator.

There will be two divisions, one with class for 4- to 6-year-olds and the other geared to 6- to 8-year-olds, said Smeall, who will be teaching the classes.

“We’ll be working on developing skills and confidence in our youngest athletes to give them some of the basics so they’ll be ready to join the older basketball leagues that Peninsula Athletic Association sponsors in the community,” Smeall said.

The minimum age for basketball leagues is 8, “so this is kind a precursor to joining the league for the little kids,” Small said.

Basketball, which is now in its eighth season, is one of the park district’s longest running programs, she added.

Classes will meet every Saturday at the Key Peninsula Civic Center gym.

The cost will be $51 for each six-week session, with scholarships available.

“What’s really exciting about this session is that we’re having some of our Parks PALS kids help teach the classes,” she said.

Kobe Frederick, 13, has been with the PALS program for two years.

“When I started, I didn’t know anything about playing basketball, but I discovered that teaching it was a really good way to learn how to play,” he said. “So Jessica asked me if I’d like to help out with the program. I enjoy being with the little kids and I enjoy playing the game and trying to teach the little kids how to play, too.”

Other PALS volunteers will also be helping with the teaching duties, “so we’ll be able to do a lot more drills,” Frederick added.

He said the focus will be on basic basketball skills such as dribbling, passing, shooting and teamwork. “It’s really going to be a lot of fun,” Frederick said. “I really support having kids my age volunteer and help with things like this.”

For information, visit keypenparks.com or call Jessica Smeall at (253) 884-9240, extension 22.

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