Key Peninsula resident and community activist George Windsor has focused on the traffic problem at the intersection in Purdy. A motivational meeting was held at Peninsula High School on March 17, with 35 community members attending.

Windsor is not affiliated with any political or activist group. He is a computer programmer employed by school districts in the Southeastern states and works by telecommunication.

The long traffic delays at the intersection in Purdy upset Windsor.

We need to fix this problem, said Windsor. The wasted time could be better spent on our job, recreation, or time with our children.

We need to spread the word to contact our elected representatives. If we build a large enough support base, the politicians will act. That will take time. We cannot expect any significant change for years, even if we motivate now. By then the problem will be far worse, he said.

Windsor has focused on a roundabout as a potential solution at the Purdy Drive/SR-302 intersection, and presents his arguments on a website at purdyturncircle.com.

Other solutions may be possible. Im just getting started with this, he said.

Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has just completed a safety upgrade project for SR-302.

Two years ago the SR-302 project focused on installing a roundabout in Purdy. Last year, after a thorough feasibility study, WSDOT determined the Purdy Bridge was a choke point, where restrictions prohibit extensive changes, and that the conflict pointscreated by a roundabout at this particular location would actually make the problem worse than it is now. The recent SR-302 work was completed without any significant work on the Purdy side of the Purdy Bridge.

Windsor intends to investigate that feasibility study and determine the best way to proceed.

Katrina and Scott Neff attended the meeting. They live in Tacoma but own a business in Gig Harbor, and are looking to move to either the Key or Gig Harbor Peninsulas. They said that something needs to be done.

Kent Kingman also attended. Kingman owns Minterbrook Oyster Company and has purchased the Tide Realty building near the Purdy intersection where he will soon start construction on a replacement 9,000 square foot building featuring office space below and an oyster bar on the second floor.

The permitting process already drew me deeply into transportation and access problems,said Kingman. The critical point is the bridge, where little can be done. The traffic problem needs to be fixed, if a way can be found.   

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